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Tier Two (Don't Delete)

Chris Ware '79

Chris Ware '79

FOOTBALL / BASKETBALL

Chris found his way from Seaside to Stevenson as a sophomore, and quickly teamed up with Ezra Burdix and Tony Woods. Alongside his two friends and teammates, Chris was a significant contributor on both the football and basketball teams during his three years as a Pirate and was All MTAL his senior year in both sports. Chris was the third leg of the threesome who lead the 1979 basketball team to a 25-0 record through the regular season, including the school’s first league championship in the sport. Ending the season 25-2, this team was comprised of the best collection of athletes in school history.

After graduating from Stevenson, Chris played three years of varsity football at Whittier College. He was team MVP in both 1983 and 1984 and All Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC) in 1982, 1983, and 1984. After college, he signed with the Oklahoma Outlaws of the United States Football League. He is an executive with the Opus Bank in Southern California.

My time at RLS was one of the most enjoyable times in my life. It was my first step toward adulthood and being faced with making adult decisions. We were allowed and encouraged to learn, make mistakes, and grow into young adults. I met lifelong friends and learned things from my teachers that have proven invaluable in college, work, and life. 

Sports was a place for me to grow, shine, and realize what being a friend and teammate means. At Stevenson the idea of settling for being a “dumb jock” was not going to fly. I was forced to put as much emphasis on school as I did sports. As I have gone on in my career, I can tell which of my employers and co-workers were involved in team athletics. Athletics teaches us that mistakes are part of life and that it’s not the mistake that defines you but how you respond. You have to move on and complete the task. Pointing fingers does not make you a good teammate or employee. Sportsmanship and teamwork are essential elements in life and I was able to learn much of these during my time at Stevenson.